Types of Women's Shirt Collars

By J.D. Chi
Women have a variety of options for golf-wear.
Women have a variety of options for golf-wear.

Women's collared shirts come in many varieties, and women golfers may take advantage of different styles on the golf course. Country clubs and many public courses do require that women wear collared shirts, although turtlenecks and mock turtlenecks are often also considered appropriate. Because collared shirts are always appropriate, if you wish to wear something else, check with the pro shop before teeing off.

Johnny Collar

Most women's golf shirts made by major manufacturers have a standard knit collar that turns down at the neck. These collars are known as Johnny collars, and on more formal shirts or blouses, they may be made of a sheer material such as lace. These collars lay flat when turned down and usually have a V-necked button-down area at the front. These collars may also be known as a Lacoste collars.

Peter Pan Collar

Often found on dressier shirts and blouses, a Peter Pan collar is known for its rounded edges. The Peter Pan collar lies flat around the neck. The opening at the front may be a V-neck or slightly rounded with buttons or without.

Turtleneck

Full turtleneck collars cover the throat and may be turned down under the chin or scrunched up under the chin. A variation is the mock turtleneck, which has a shorter neck than the standard turtleneck and covers about half the neck. This style has gained popularity as an alternative to traditional collared shirts on the PGA Tour in recent years.

Other Types of Collars

Although not generally considered acceptable on the golf course, women's shirts may also come with sailor or middy collars, shawl collars or man-tailored collars. The sailor shirt resembles a Navy shirt with a V-neck, large square of fabric at the back and may have a scarf. The shawl collar is popular on cardigan sweaters and begins with a V-neck that is elongated and resembles lapels on a jacket. The man-tailored collar is most often found on button-down shirts, may require a collar stay and is usually attached to the shirt at the points with buttons.

About the Author

J.D. Chi is a professional journalist who has covered sports for more than 20 years at newspapers all over the United States. She has covered major golf tournaments and the NFL as well as travel and health topics. Chi received her Bachelor of Arts in professional writing from Carnegie Mellon University and is working toward a master's degree in journalism.

Photo Credits

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