Tailoring Your Game for Mountain, Desert and Links Style Courses

By Ben Myers
You never know when and from where the wind is going to come from on a links course, so keep the ball flight low.
You never know when and from where the wind is going to come from on a links course, so keep the ball flight low.

Like with many outdoor sports, success in golf depends quite heavily on the ability to adapt to nature. Links, mountain and desert-style golf courses span a range of distinct climates and earth formations, and successful game plans vary widely depending on these factors. No course is exactly alike, but in all cases, the key to success is in learning how to adjust to the surroundings.

Links: Stay Out of the Wind

With water on the right and nothing but sand on the left, the 17th tee shot on Kiawah's Ocean Course presents a typical links course dilemma; choosing between the lesser of two evils.
With water on the right and nothing but sand on the left, the 17th tee shot on Kiawah's Ocean Course presents a typical links course dilemma; choosing between the lesser of two evils.

Mountain: Keep It Short

You will probably add distance in the mountains, which can make distance control difficult.
You will probably add distance in the mountains, which can make distance control difficult.

Desert: Drink Water & Consider the Season

Plan for your second shot before you even tee off on desert courses.
Plan for your second shot before you even tee off on desert courses.

About the Author

Ben Myers has been writing professionally since 2006. His work has appeared in metropolitan, community and business publications in Oregon, Chicago and New Orleans. Myers has earned numerous awards from the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, Chicago Headline Club and Louisiana Press Association. He holds an M.S. in journalism from the University of Oregon.

Photo Credits

  • Warren Little/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
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