What Is Stack & Tilt in Golf?

By Robert Preston

The stack and tilt golf swing is a method that can look quite jarring to someone seeing it for the first time. It does not follow many of the principles that have long been considered the basics of a swing, opting instead to focus on a form that does not require as much weight-shifting, making it easier to stay in front of the ball at impact.

Weight Distribution

The primary goal of the stack and tilt swing is to minimize the shifting of weight through the swing process. With a standard swing, the weight goes toward the player's rear leg on the backswing, then pushes forward during the downswing so it finishes in front of the ball, allowing the player to drive through. With stack and tilt, the player's weight never shifts behind the ball, instead staying in front throughout the swing.

Swing Path

The swing path with stack and tilt also differs greatly from the "normal" swing plane. While players have been trained to swing straight back from the ball, in a nearly vertical arcing path, with the stack and tilt swing, the player's arms come around on a much flatter arc, with the club pointing farther behind the player.

Spine Alignment

The alignment of the spine is a key part of playing with a stack and tilt swing. Throughout the entire swing, the player keeps his spine erect while also keeping his weight forward. This has the effect of making the player appear to be leaning his upper body toward his lead leg during the backswing.

Legs

The legs in stack and tilt golf serve similar roles to each other in the two halves of the swing. During the backswing, the lead leg flexes slightly, while the rear leg straightens as the club is wound back. To unwind down on the ball, the rear leg is flexed in while the front leg is straightens out.

Follow-through

As with the standard golf swing, the golfer who utilizes a stack and tilt swing will follow through so the shoulders are pointing down the target line. The player's torso will be flexed back slightly, creating an arched shape, similar to the silhouette on the PGA Tour logo.

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