Proper Selection of a Driver for Golf

By Sharon Penn
Try out drivers to see which one works best for your swing.
Try out drivers to see which one works best for your swing.

Today’s drivers are longer and more forgiving than ever. That’s good news for golfers in the market for a new driver. When you are ready to make a purchase, do some research and try out several drivers to see which one works best for you. In general, a driver with a large club face, flexible shaft and higher loft will help high handicappers launch the ball into the air. Less flexible shafts are designed for more accuracy, but they are harder to hit.

Increasing Forgiveness

For golfers who want a driver that will be forgiving of mishits, large club faces with large sweet spots can increase forgiveness and allow more power behind the ball.

Achieving Distance

Drivers that have aerodynamic soles that allow air to flow around them easily will create less drag. For high handicappers, less drag can mean more distance. Some clubs have heel/toe scoops that can increase the speed of the club head by 3 or 4 miles per hour. Drivers that have a high moment of inertia (MOI) promote strong downswing speed and can promote more distance off the tee.

Preventing a Slice

There are drivers on the market designed to prevent slices. In some cases the club head will feature a contour that promotes the visualization of an inside-out swing. A more closed face provides the slicer with a better chance to hit a straight shot, or even a draw.

Maintaining Consistency

Mid- to low-handicappers may prefer a driver with a more rigid sole to reduce spin rates for consistency while encouraging a higher launch. For the golfer who enjoys using clubs with a non-traditional shape, a driver with a triangular head creates consistency along with speed and stability. Weighting in the front and rear of the club face raises the MOI, making it forgiving of off-center strikes.

Adjusting Club Face Angles

Some drivers have adjustable hosels so you can change the angle of the club face from neutral to closed or open. Other drivers are adjustable in other ways. Middle handicappers and high handicappers can benefit from adjusting the club to their preference.

About the Author

Sharon Penn is a writer based in South Florida. A professional writer since 1981, she has created numerous materials for a Princeton advertising agency. Her articles have appeared in "Golf Journal" and on industry blogs. Penn has traveled extensively, is an avid golfer and is eager to share her interests with her readers. She holds a Master of Science in Education.

Photo Credits

  • Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images
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