Postural Stability Exercise

By Steve Silverman
Reverse fly exercises help support a proper stance.
Reverse fly exercises help support a proper stance.

Proper posture is one of the keys to a consistent and successful golf swing. A rounded or hunched back results in an off-plane golf swing and, therefore, poor contact and golf shots that go left or right of the target. Postural problems have grown significantly worse in recent decades as our society has become more sedentary. Good posture leads to stronger shoulder, neck, back and hamstring muscles and vice versa. Postural stability exercises strengthen these muscles, providing a solid foundation for the golf swing.

Do the reverse fly. Sit on an exercise bench and hold 3-pound weights extended in front of you. Bring them both to the side so both arms are extended outward. Return to your original position and repeat the exercise 10 times. This will help build up muscles around the shoulder blades and the spine.

Shrug your shoulders. Hold 3-pound weights in each hand, shrug your shoulders up and hold the position for 3 seconds. Return to the original position and then repeat the exercise 10 times.

Do arm circles. Hold your arms out to your sides and swing them in small, forward circles for 15 seconds at a time. Take a 5-second break and repeat the forward arm swing. Then reverse the swing, doing two 15-second rotations.

Stretch out your hamstrings to improve your posture. Individuals with tight hamstrings tend to pitch their bodies forward because their strong leg muscles are pulling them in that direction. Sit on the ground with your knees bent out to the sides and the soles of your feet touching. Lean to your right knee and hold the stretch for 15 seconds. Return to the original position and then stretch to your left for 15 seconds. Return to the original position and then lean forward for 15 seconds. Repeat each stretch three times.

Do a neck roll to gain greater flexibility and strength while improving your posture. Stand up straight and lean your head back. Roll your head to your right shoulder and then roll it to just above your left shoulder. Roll it back to the right and return it to your original position. Repeat this neck roll three times.

About the Author

Steve Silverman is an award-winning writer, covering sports since 1980. Silverman authored The Minnesota Vikings: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Who's Better, Who's Best in Football -- The Top 60 Players of All-Time, among others, and placed in the Pro Football Writers of America awards three times. Silverman holds a Master of Science in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism.

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