How to Paint Golf Club Shafts

By Bill Herrfeldt

First, it was outlandish pants that set golfers apart from each other. Next, it was head covers that showed a lot of creativity; then the professional women turned to painted balls to make a fashion statement. Now it has become the rage to have club shafts painted in different colors. In fact, some of the manufacturers make clubs with shafts of different colors. If you have a set of clubs that you would like to paint, there are a few steps you should follow.

Prepare the shaft. It makes no difference if you are working with a graphite or a steel shaft, because each has to be roughed up so that the paint will adhere. Using 100-grit sandpaper, make sure that the coating of the entire shaft is roughed up and that it is completely free of dirt, debris and fingerprints. Fingerprints are particularly harmful, because the oil from your hands will infiltrate the grooves you have made with the sandpaper, and your shaft will not take the paint.

Mask the grip and the clubhead by covering them with either masking tape or plastic bags that have been secured with tape.

Spread out a newspaper or a large piece of plastic that covers about 3 to 4 feet more than the shaft you are painting. Spray on a coat of primer. You might consider using a latex-based primer, because it is easier to clean up. Also, be sure that both your primer and your paint are formulated to be used on metallic surfaces. Since you only need to coat the shaft with a small amount of primer, a good way to determine if you have sprayed on too much is if it drips from the bottom of the shaft. If you apply too much primer, it will be easily chipped. Allow the primer to completely dry before you proceed to the next step.

Begin applying your spray paint by spraying the entire length of the shaft, twisting the shaft carefully as you apply the paint. Again, don't overdo it because the shaft needs only a small amount of paint to make it the color you have chosen. When you are finished, place a piece of wood under both the grip and the clubhead and allow the shaft to completely dry. Plan on allowing your shafts about 48 hours to dry completely before you use them.

About the Author

Bill Herrfeldt specializes in finance, sports and the needs of retiring people, and has been published in the national edition of "Erickson Tribune," the "Washington Post" and the "Arizona Republic." He graduated from the University of Louisville.

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