How Do I Master a Driver Golf Swing?

By Sharon Penn
Go back to basics to make a powerful tee shot with a driver.
Go back to basics to make a powerful tee shot with a driver.

The driver is the club that will get you the most distance, but unfortunately, because of the length of the shaft and the low loft angle of the club face, it is a difficult club to hit. In order to achieve the distance and accuracy you expect when hitting a drive off the tee, go back to swing basics. Pay attention from setup to follow-through, and you should be able to master the driver swing.

Place your feet in a wide stance about shoulder distance apart, and position the ball off the inside of your left heel. Your head will be behind the ball, and your weight will favor the back leg. Tilt your spine so that the right shoulder is lower than the left. This setup promotes a sweeping path of your swing.

Check to make sure you are gripping the club in your fingers, and not in the palm of your hand. Do not grip the club tightly. Allow the club to hover above the ground instead of grounding the club. This also promotes a wide takeaway for a sweeping path.

Begin the backswing by keeping the club head low and sweeping the club back. Turn your shoulders around your spine, and shift your weight to the back foot. Your left shoulder moves toward your right armpit, and the toe of the club face will point up.

Take the club back so that your arms and the club are parallel to the ground and your wrists are cocked at 90 degrees at the top of the backswing. Uncoil your body for the downswing by moving your lower body first, and then your upper body and arms. Your left knee will move toward the target as your weight shifts to the front foot. A quick hip rotation will generate the power you need for distance.

Keep your hands cocked for as long as possible before releasing them at impact. When the club makes contact with the ball, your arms will be stretched out and you will feel the weight of the club face. Finish the shot by hitting through the ball for a strong follow-through. By the end of the swing, your back heel will be up and your back toe is pointed toward the ground.

About the Author

Sharon Penn is a writer based in South Florida. A professional writer since 1981, she has created numerous materials for a Princeton advertising agency. Her articles have appeared in "Golf Journal" and on industry blogs. Penn has traveled extensively, is an avid golfer and is eager to share her interests with her readers. She holds a Master of Science in Education.

Photo Credits

  • Dynamic Graphics Group/Dynamic Graphics Group/Getty Images
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