Long Putter Techniques

By Patrick Cameron
Long putters eliminate wrist movement and can improve your consistency on the greens.
Long putters eliminate wrist movement and can improve your consistency on the greens.

In the past, long putters required a second take by people watching the PGA. And, while they are not always accepted by golf purists, they are an effective weapon on the green. After all, you drive for show, but you putt for dough. Any advantage is fair game, as long as it's legal. Handled with proper technique, long putters help eliminate the wrists from the putting stroke, allowing for square contact at impact and a more precise ball roll.

Set up just as you would with a regular-length putter. The feet, knees, hips and shoulders should all be lined up with the target line you have read for the green. Distance-wise, set up so that your eyes are over the ball, similar to where you would position yourself with a regular-length putter.

Line the putter so that it runs from the ball to the middle of your chest. Place your grip slightly forward of center (1 inch). If you have the putter grip centered in your chest, the leading edge of the putter head may be in front of the shaft when contacting the ball, causing the ball to pull.

Set your top hand grip. For the top part of the long putter grip, simply grab the putter with your lead hand like you would a broom handle. Your finger should be wrapping around the grip toward your body, your back hand and knuckles on the outside. The key is to have a locked grip on the putter at the top, because your putter will swing off the pendulum point on your body created by the top hand grip.

Set your lower hand grip. Typically, people use a claw-like grip on the lower part of the putter, placing your fingers on the outside of the shaft, your thumb on the inside. Allow the lower putter grip to slide up in to the natural V that runs between your pointer finger and your thumb.

Bring your elbows in so that they are tight on the body. This will keep your putting line straight through your motion.

Make the stroke. The stroke should be a simple pendulum action, without any movement in the body, either upper or lower. To stroke the ball, keep your top grip stable and use your lower grip hand to pull the putter back and through the ball.

About the Author

Patrick Cameron is a freelance writer with 10 years of diverse experience in consumer goods branding, promotions and retail communications. He works out of his home in Denver, Colo. He received his Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from the University of Minnesota.

Photo Credits

  • Michael Cohen/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
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