Improving Your Golf Technique

By Sharon Penn
Turn your shoulders to bring the club back.
Turn your shoulders to bring the club back.

The game of golf can provide many years of pleasure as you spend a beautiful day on the links. To improve your technique, take the time to practice on the driving range. Sometimes just a small adjustment can have a strong effect. Practicing the swing from address to release will create the “muscle memory” you need for consistency. Then get out there on the course and have a good time.

Focus on your golf shot before you address the ball. Notice the curve of the fairway and the contours of the turf. Look for hazards like water and fairway bunkers, and take wind into consideration.

Check your grip to make sure the club is lying across your fingers, and not in the palm of your hand. The club should reach from just below the second joint of your index finger to the base of your pinky finger. Squeeze the club gently with the last three fingers of the left hand, for right-handed players. The reverse is true for lefties.

Stand with your feet shoulder-distance apart for a drive and a little closer for other clubs. Position the ball even with the inside of your front heel. Bend your knees slightly, and allow your arms to hang down from your shoulders with out tension.

Bring the club back with a shoulder turn, moving your front shoulder under your chin as it approaches the back armpit. Resist the urge to sway to the side. Keep your posture and balance steady as you swing. Cock your wrists to 90 degrees by the time your arms bring the club back so it is parallel to the ground. Keep your wrists in a cocked position until impact. Your weight will shift to the back foot during the backswing.

Begin the downswing by moving your forward knee toward the target. Shift your weight to your front foot as the upper body remains in a coiled position. Your back shoulder should drop to allow for an efficient downswing. Unhinge the wrists as you impact the ball. Hit through the ball by using a strong follow-through.

About the Author

Sharon Penn is a writer based in South Florida. A professional writer since 1981, she has created numerous materials for a Princeton advertising agency. Her articles have appeared in "Golf Journal" and on industry blogs. Penn has traveled extensively, is an avid golfer and is eager to share her interests with her readers. She holds a Master of Science in Education.

Photo Credits

  • flashfilm/Lifesize/Getty Images
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