How to Improve a Golf Swing with Sensory Motor Learning

By Chad Buleen
Developing sensory motor skills can significantly improve a player's golf game.
Developing sensory motor skills can significantly improve a player's golf game.

Improving a golf swing with sensory motor learning is something that is possible for golfers to do, however doing this requires focused work. Training by developing sensory motor skills demands you to do more than simply go to the driving range and hit a bunch of balls.

Start with the right mindset. Realize that everything you do on the golf course is able to affect your sensory motor learning ability. Before you begin hitting at the driving range or start a round, understand that every movement of your body and every thought in your head will either positively or adversely affect you as you try to train yourself with sensory motor learning.

Go through each of the four phases of the golf swing. The first phase is the setup. This will help you learn proper leg placement and shoulder placement and how to flex and straighten your knees, spine, neck and hips. You will learn balance in this step. The second phase is the back swing, the third phase is the down swing and the fourth phase is impact. All four phases must be done in order to promote sensory learning.

Be active. When you practice your shots, do not merely go through the motions halfway. Likewise, do not focus more one one aspect of the shot--i.e. the back swing--and forget about the other phases of the shot. Your shot must be performed in the same manner that it would on the golf course for sensory motor learning to occur.

Control your emotions on bad shots and be extra pleased with good shots. The more emotions you have, the more your sensory motor learning is stimulated. Thus, if you shoot a bad shot and get very angry, your body will remember that shot. However, if you focus more on being extra pleased on good shots, you can train your body to remember those shots, instead.

Practice for quality, not quantity. As you practice your swing, you must be fresh and rested. The more rested you are, the more likely your body is to hit the ball properly. On the other hand, if you are tired you will become fatigued and begin to slightly alter your swing. This makes the sensory learning experience ineffective because you will end up remembering the wrong kinds of shots.

Photo Credits

  • Andrew Redington/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
Home