How to Hit Your Golf Ball to a Target

By Robert Preston
Aiming every shot as if it were for a target as small as the flag allows you to hit the fairway more often.
Aiming every shot as if it were for a target as small as the flag allows you to hit the fairway more often.

Too often, golfers make the mistake of being vague with goals when approaching a ball and obsessing about all the ways a shot can go wrong. According to the golf forum GolfRewind.com, by selecting a specific target on every shot and focusing on hitting to that target, a golfer can greatly increase the accuracy of his swings, lowering his score. While adding steps to pick out a target can feel odd at first, as it adds to your pre-shot routine, it becomes second nature with repetition.

Pick a target for your shot that is as precise as possible. Instead of aiming to shoot for the fairway, aim for a specific part of the fairway that provides you with the best possible situation for your next shot.

Stand several steps behind the ball so that the the ball is located along a hypothetical line between where you are standing and the target at which you are aiming.

Locate an object on the ground between the ball and the target that is between 1 foot and 1 yard from the ball. It is difficult to have proper perspective when standing over a ball and lining up the clubface at a target several hundred yards away. However, you can be far more accurate with an object such as a rock or a tall blade of grass that is close to the ball.

Aim the clubface so that it is directing the ball over the object, and position your body accordingly in your preferred stance for swinging.

Ignore any potential hazards such as bunkers or lakes that your ball could land in if improperly hit. You will have factored in the best way to avoid trouble when deciding where to hit. Continuing to obsess over the danger after this decision only will increase your chances of hitting into it.

Focus instead on the target at which you are aiming, and where you want the ball to finish.

Swing the club only when you are aimed over the object and you are sure your mind is off the danger and on the target.

Photo Credits

  • Golf Course Green with a red flag on a cloudy day image by Vanessa van Rensburg from Fotolia.com
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