How Do I Hit a Driver Off the Tee?

By Robert Preston
An inaccurate driver can add unwanted penalty strokes, so spending extra time on the range is important.
An inaccurate driver can add unwanted penalty strokes, so spending extra time on the range is important.

The driver is the most popular club for many weekend golfers, as it is the club in the bag capable of propelling the ball the greatest distance when swung. Unfortunately, the driver can also be one of the most difficult clubs for a golfer to hit, with many players suffering from slices or hooks that leave their balls in the deep rough or out of play altogether.

Tee up the ball so that the midsection of the ball is aligned approximately with the top of the driver when the driver is resting flat on the ground behind the ball.

Address the ball in a relaxed stance, with your feet slightly wider than when playing an iron. This extra distance allows for greater control over the longer club.

Move your hands farther down on the club so that you are holding it 1 inch to 2 inches below the top of the grip. This allows for greater control over the club, and the marginal amount of distance lost is made up for in more accurate drives.

Minimize the length of your backswing to avoid over-swinging. Many golfers complete a full wind up, with the club coming all the way around to parallel to the ground. However, this is more length than is needed, and it leads to more erratic shots.

Drop down slightly with your legs as you begin your downswing. This allows you to begin building momentum to twist through.

Swing down on the ball, aiming to push the head of the driver down into the ball and allowing it to lift the ball naturally, rather than trying to consciously lift the ball with the club.

Follow through toward the target so that you finish with your hips turned toward the front and your shoulders pointed at the target.

Photo Credits

  • Andrew Redington/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
Home