How to Hit a Driver in Golf Using Taylor Made Golf Clubs

By Joshua Smothers
If you play a TaylorMade driver, you're in good company. Tour pros Justin Rose, Sergio Garcia and Darren Clarke have all been on the TaylorMade team.
If you play a TaylorMade driver, you're in good company. Tour pros Justin Rose, Sergio Garcia and Darren Clarke have all been on the TaylorMade team.

Learning how to hit a driver correctly is one of the most important aspects to the game of golf. TaylorMade, one of the premier golf club manufacturers, designs drivers for the novice player who plays once a year, and for experienced players who make a living playing the sport. With enough practice, you can learn how to hit a TaylorMade driver long and straight.

Decide which TaylorMade driver you want to hit. TaylorMade offers a wide variety of drivers for players at varying levels of experience. Choose the driver you want to play based on your experience, price range and weaknesses in your game. Often you can help compensate for certain swing flaws with the right equipment.

Take a few practice swings with your driver with a light grip. Gripping the club too tightly can put too much tension on your wrists and forearms.

Press down with the base of your right thumb onto the top of your left thumb (for a right-handed golfer). This helps keep your hands together during the swing and prevents the driver's club face from opening up on the downswing.

Bend slightly at the knees so you can shift your body weight during your swing. Keep your feet about shoulder width apart of whatever feels natural and keeps your balance.

Point your right elbow down at the top of your backswing. This helps keep the club parallel to your target and helps in hitting the ball straight.

Shift your body slightly toward the target on the downswing. Keep your shoulders square.

Swing straight through the ball, and make sure your arms are pointed at your target after you have made contact.

About the Author

Joshua Smothers works at the Gannett Des Moines Design Studio, designing sports pages and special sections for four Midwest newspapers. He previously served as a designer, copy editor and reporter for "The Des Moines Register." Smothers graduated from Wartburg College in 2003 with Bachelor of Arts degrees in journalism and public relations.

Photo Credits

  • Ross Kinnaird/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
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