Golf Tips for Hybrid Clubs

By Denise Sullivan
Handle any situation on the golf course with a hybrid club.
Handle any situation on the golf course with a hybrid club.

Hybrid golf clubs are a mix between a wood and an iron and can be used for anything from a chip shot out of the bunker to a long approach from the fairway. Their versatility saves you money on equipment and cuts down on the number of clubs you have to carry in your golf bag. The club head is heavier than the head of a typical iron, which allows it to slide along the bunker instead of digging into the sand and cutting your swing short. Hybrid clubs are also helpful when your ball is stuck in the rough, because the large head does not get twisted by the high grass as it approaches the ball, which keeps your shot on target.

Chipping

Treat your hybrid club like a putter when hitting a short chip shot from the edge of the green. Use a putting grip and shorten your backswing and follow-through. "Choke up" on the grip by sliding your hands down toward the club head if you need more stability and control on the shot.

Ball Position

Adjust your stance so the ball is slightly closer to your front foot than usual when hitting shots from a good spot in the fairway. If you are in the rough or a bunker, place the ball an inch or two farther back in your stance to make it easier to hit the ball before the club hits the ground. Hybrids usually have shorter shafts than traditional golf clubs, so move closer to the ball if you are having trouble adjusting to a new hybrid club.

Experiment on the Practice Range

Because a hybrid club has so many uses, it can take more time on the practice range to become comfortable with it. Experiment with different ball placements first to find the spot where it is easiest for you to strike the ball with the sweet spot of the club face. Move your hands lower on the grip and hit a few more shots to practice for short approaches and chips.

Keep Your Backswing High in Tough Spots

Use your wrists to quickly raise the club head to waist height so you can drive down into the ball at contact and loft it out of difficult terrain. Move your hands, wrists and arms together as one unit on the backswing to keep the club in line. Keep the wrists locked until you have pulled the club back about 8 inches. By the time you have pulled the club back 12 inches, the shaft should parallel to the ground.

About the Author

Denise Sullivan has been writing professionally for more than five years after a long career in business. She has been published on Yahoo! Voices and other publications. Her areas of expertise are business, law, gaming, home renovations, gardening, sports and exercise.

Photo Credits

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