Golf Teaching Aids

By Jon McCammon
Teaching aids can improve your score.
Teaching aids can improve your score.

The average golfer doesn't spend enough time with training equipment that is intended to improve his game. If you want to enjoy the game of golf even more, you should consider using a training aid that has the potential to lower your score. After all, the game of golf is better when you aren't trying to get out of jail (in the trees) or taking extra strokes to reach the green. We will approach the teaching aids starting with the grip, working through the proper swing plane and finishing with correct ball contact.

Grip It to Rip It

Get the proper grip.
Get the proper grip.

The first thing you need to correct or improve on is how you grip the golf club. A soft grip allows for more power through the ball, which leads to longer drives and better distance with your irons. Grip too tightly, and you'll be hitting hooks or slices. A teaching aid called the Swing Glove properly sets your wrist from the back swing all the way through contact and finish. It uses a hinge mechanism that gives you feedback when you begin your swing. As you pull away from address (back swing), the Swing Glove will guide your wrist at the proper angle so that you can feel what a correct wrist position is. Correcting your grip will allow you to square up on the ball at contact, thus improving direction and distance.

Swing Away

Spend plenty of time on the driving range to improve your swing.
Spend plenty of time on the driving range to improve your swing.

The next part of your training is correcting and improving the golf swing. Go to your local driving range, and you'll probably see an apparatus that looks like a giant hula hoop standing near on-edge. This device is meant to give you feedback on your take away and follow-through. You should use this device with an older club, one that you don't carry in your bag or use at the driving range. Stand in the hoop as if you are addressing a ball at center and start your back swing. Keep the shaft of the club in contact with the hoop all the way to the apex of your back swing. Now begin your forward motion and follow through the strike zone. Finish your swing at the top and notice whether or not the shaft of the club leaves contact with the hoop.
This should be practiced several times so that your body and posture are mentally retained for how the swing should feel.

We Have Contact

Teaching aids provide visual feedback about your swing.
Teaching aids provide visual feedback about your swing.

So now you have the grip and the swing posture figured out, but putting the club face on the ball is still a problem. Sometimes you hit it fat and other times you hit it thin, but what you really intended to do was hit it square. A training aid on the market for the past few years has been proved to help with swings, particularly at the impact point. The Inside Approach Golf Swing Trainer will give you visual feedback on your swing and whether or not you are making good contact with the ball. The dynamics of the golf swing involve squaring the club face before it comes into contact with the ball. If you have poor swing dynamics, you probably pull or, more often, slice your shots. This training aid can improve these dynamics and help you get the face of the club squared at impact.

About the Author

Living in Corona California, Jon McCammon has been writing about golf and golf related activities for several months. His articles appear on GolfLink.com where his background gives an insider's view of the casual sport. McCammon is a technical writer for a large U.S. based corporation and holds a Bachelor of Science degree from West Coast University.

Photo Credits

  • Ian Walton/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
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