Golf Swing Tips for Elbow Release

By Marc Jenkins
Getting an optimal elbow release during the entire swing from the approach to the follow-through is an important part of the golf swing.
Getting an optimal elbow release during the entire swing from the approach to the follow-through is an important part of the golf swing.

Golfers frequently tend to use unhealthy or poor quality swing methods, whether it is a matter of over-swinging, under-swinging or misusing a single body part. A common practice of poor mechanics is a golfer’s failure to get an optimal elbow release during his entire swing from the approach to the follow-through.

In Your Approach

Put the ball on the ground and place your golf club through your elbows behind you to gather perfect posture.

When you stand and spread your feet, get an equal distribution of weight in every dimension of your body.

Before you start your swing, keep your knees flexed and your back completely flat so you can make a smooth transition into your golf swing.

In Your Backswing

Transfer all of your body weight to your back foot while tilting your shoulders perpendicularly, with the front one pointing down and the back one pointing up. Make sure the toe of your club is pointing skyward halfway through.

To get a generous amount of force on the ball, release your weight effortlessly from your back foot to the instep of your front foot.

Move your head slightly backward and keep your elbows in a locked yet comfortable position.

When You Hit the Ball

Now you’re ready to make contact with the ball. Move your hips and shift even more toward your front foot with a minor side motion.

When swinging, point the club end in your back elbow downward toward your back foot while releasing to your back foot’s instep.

Once you have the majority of your body weight on your front foot, you should be able to stroke the ball smoothly and accurately because your elbows will be able to release properly.

In Your Follow-Through

Release your hips by rotating them through and have them facing the target along with your belly button and shoulders. Again, make sure the toe of your club is pointing skyward halfway through.

Balance your body’s weight on your back toe as your front supports most of your weight. Begin to slowly relax your elbows as you watch the ball fly.

Bring your entire body to a smooth, effortless stop.

Resources

About the Author

Marc Jenkins has been writing since 2008. His work has appeared in numerous online publications, and he is also co-host of the Double Play Sports Hour, a sports talk radio show on WBCR 1090AM in New York City. He studied English and mass communications at Virginia State University.

Photo Credits

  • golf player swinging across a river image by Xavier MARCHANT from Fotolia.com
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