Golf Swing: How to Avoid Flipping the Club

By Patrick Cameron
Club flipping comes from premature wrist break and results in weak hits, slices and push shots.
Club flipping comes from premature wrist break and results in weak hits, slices and push shots.

Golf can be a frustrating game. One day, you go out and everything seems to work. The next, the ball is flying all over the course. A common symptom that plagues beginner to intermediate golfers is the tendency to flip the wrists at, or before, impact with the ball. This causes the club head to be offline at impact and results in inconsistent hits. The key to breaking this habit is to get the wrists to break at, or beyond, the point of impact, resulting in solid, square-faced contact.

Grip the club. Place a tee in your right palm (for a right-handed golfer), so that it runs down the middle.

Take a few practice swings without a ball. The tee should remain in the same place.

Hit balls with the tee running in your palm. This will prevent you from breaking your non-lead wrist (the wrist that is farthest from the hole).

Continue practicing with the tee until the feeling has become ingrained.

Remove the tee and try your new non-flipping swing.

One-Armed Swing

Hold the club with just your right hand (left hand for a left-handed golfer).

Practice a small chipping stroke using only this hand.

Focus on keeping your wrist from breaking as you go through impact.

Practice the stroke until you have a natural feel for where the angle of your bottom wrist should be at impact.

About the Author

Patrick Cameron is a freelance writer with 10 years of diverse experience in consumer goods branding, promotions and retail communications. He works out of his home in Denver, Colo. He received his Bachelor of Arts in mass communication from the University of Minnesota.

Photo Credits

  • Harry How/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
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