Golf Hitting Tips

By Sharon Penn
Golfers should learn to use a variety of shots on the golf course in order to lower their scores over time.
Golfers should learn to use a variety of shots on the golf course in order to lower their scores over time.

Once you know the basics of the golf swing, it’s time to focus on other shots you need to achieve a decent score on the course. As a golfer, you know that some holes curve right, while some curve left. If you know how to produce a fade to the right and a draw to the left, you will have an advantage when teeing off on curved fairways. You should also know how to get out of the rough grass along the fairway, and what to do if you land in a sand trap.

Producing a Fade or a Draw

To produce a fade to the right for the right-handed golfer, tee the ball up on the right side of the tee box. Stand closer to the ball than you normally would and tee the ball lower. Your stance will be slightly open and the club face also will be opened slightly. Your feet are aligned to the left of the target. Finish with your hands high above your head. This will produce a more upright swing plane, and the ball will move from left to right. For left-handed golfers, reverse the left and right instructions.

To produce a draw to the leftfor the right-handed golfer, tee the ball up on the left side of the tee box, and tee the ball up high. Your stance is slightly closed, and the club is pointed slightly to the right of the target. Close the clubface slightly. Stand farther away from the ball than you would for a normal swing, and swing around your body. Your hands should finish lower. The ball will move from right to left. For left-handed golfers, reverse the left and right instructions.

Hitting Out of a Bunker

When you land in a sand trap, it’s important to put your annoyance aside and focus on your bunker shot. The goal is to get the ball up into the air quickly, and let it roll on the green. For a sand shot, the club face should be a little more open than for a normal chip shot. Keep your hands close to your body on the backswing with your elbows bent. The follow through is very important in a bunker shot, so swing through the sand as you make contact with the ball. Resist the urge to look up too soon to see where the ball landed.

Hitting Out of the Rough

Chances are you will find yourself in the rough at some point during a game of golf. The goal here is to get out of the rough onto the fairway, and for deep rough the best club to use is a wedge or high to mid iron. Play the ball in back of your stance, pick the club up steeply in the backswing and hit down sharply and strongly as you impact the ball. Hold your grip tighter than you normally would, so the grass does not prevent you from following through. Swing smoothly as you hit through the grass and try to accelerate on impact. For rough that is not as dense, you may have some success with a hybrid for a longer shot.

About the Author

Sharon Penn is a writer based in South Florida. A professional writer since 1981, she has created numerous materials for a Princeton advertising agency. Her articles have appeared in "Golf Journal" and on industry blogs. Penn has traveled extensively, is an avid golfer and is eager to share her interests with her readers. She holds a Master of Science in Education.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images
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