Golf: How to Chip

By Tyson Simmons
Chipping generally is not a full swing motion, so practicing feel and touch around the green is helpful.
Chipping generally is not a full swing motion, so practicing feel and touch around the green is helpful.

Chipping, while being commonly pushed aside for driving and putting, is an important part of the game. Most players set aside time to practice on the driving range or the putting green, but they might overlook spending time on improving their chipping game. It's important to hone all the aspects of your game to work on lowering your handicap.

Choose a club suited for the shot. The aim for chipping is to loft the ball as little distance as possible and roll the ball the rest of the way to the hole. The steeper the angle of the club, the less roll you will get from the ball. Try leaving the safe zone of using your pitching wedge or sand wedge and use an 8- or 6-iron for more roll.

Start the stroke with a steady, even-tempered backswing. Don't get carried away and swing at the ball too hard. Remember that you are trying to gently roll the ball to the hole, even if you are pitching the ball a good distance.

Swing through the ball solidly as you keep your left wrist stiff. Don't let your wrist twist as you swing through the stroke. Keep your eye on the ball as the swing unfolds, and don't be particular about style. Chipping is much more about results than grace.

Finish the swing loosely, letting the club guide the direction of your arms.

About the Author

Tyson Simmons started writing professionally in 2005 and has worked for multiple media firms and publications, including "EQ Automotive" and various websites. He mainly covers the automotive and technical fields. Simmons has an English writing certification from Uintah Basin Applied Technology College and is also A+ computer repair certified. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in English writing at Utah State University.

Photo Credits

  • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images
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