Golf Back Exercises

By Katie Jensen
Stronger back muscles will help you hit longer while decreasing risk of injury.
Stronger back muscles will help you hit longer while decreasing risk of injury.

Golfing puts wear and tear on the back. Swinging the golf club torques the torso. A strong back means the ball can be hit farther without hurting yourself. Back pain affects up to 80 percent of people in the United States at one point or another, according to webmd.com. Strengthening back muscles is one part of the equation and strengthening the stomach muscles is the other part of the equation for a stronger back and a more consistent golf swing.

Leg Cross Overs

Lie flat on your back with your legs in front of you and your arms outstretched to either side at shoulder level. Raise your left leg 12 inches off the floor. Hold for a count of 10. Bring the leg all the way up so your toe is pointing at the ceiling. Cross the leg over your body so it is now pointing to your right hand and is parallel to the floor. Do not lift your shoulders off the floor. Hold for a count of 10. Slowly bring the leg back to where your toe is pointing at the ceiling and then lower it to the floor. Complete the exercise with the other leg.

Crunches

Stomach crunches strength the abdominal muscles. Lie flat on the floor with your knees bent. Clasp your hands and put them behind your head. If you're out of shape, cross your arms over your chest instead. Bring your shoulders and upper back off the ground. Repeat a number of times. Exactly how many depends on what condition you're in. Aim for 20 and then increase as your muscles get stronger.

Lie flat on the floor with knees bent. Bring your right foot up and place it on your left knee. Your right leg now forms a 90 degree angle. Do the stomach crunch but twist to the right instead of just up and down. Change the leg position so your left foot is on your right knee. Do the stomach crunch but twist to the left.

Stretches

Lengthening the muscles by stretching feels good if done properly and is good for you. Lie face down on the floor. Bend your arms and place your palms flat on the ground facing each other underneath your chest. Push up as far as is comfortable and tilt your head back to look at the ceiling. Hold for a count of 15. Relax and repeat.

If you've ever seen a dog that just woke up from a nap, you'll notice they stretch. Mimic that stretch. Get on hands and knees. Push your backside up as you lower your chest to the ground and straighten your arms. Hold for a count of 15. Return to the original position and repeat.

About the Author

Katie Jensen's first book was published in 2000. Since then she has written additional books as well as screenplays, website content and e-books. Rosehill holds a Master of Business Administration from Arizona State University. Her articles specialize in business and personal finance. Her passion includes cooking, eating and writing about food.

Photo Credits

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