How to Explain the Parts of a Golf Club

By William McCoy
A golf club consists of the grip, shaft and head.
A golf club consists of the grip, shaft and head.

When teaching golf to someone who wishes to learn the game, it's important to give him a complete understanding of the sport's equipment. In golf, the golf club is central to every player's list of equipment. Although golf clubs differ significantly in style, function and brand, a number of common attributes make up every club. Even if you aren't an accomplished player, you should have no trouble explaining the parts of a club to a beginner.

Explain how the grip of a golf club wraps around the end of the shaft and show the individual how the grip is sticky and made of either rubber, leather, cord or a synthetic material. Allow the individual to hold the club to feel the grip to determine its material. Stress how some grips are a rubber sheath while others are leather and wrapped around the shaft.

Point out the shaft of one or more golf clubs and explain how club shafts are available in many lengths and styles. Common shaft styles include steel, fiberglass and graphite. The taller the player, the longer the shaft she requires.

Demonstrate the different styles of clubheads on such clubs as a driver, iron and putter. Show how a driver, whether made of wood, metal or composite materials, is typically circular and bulbous. An iron has a wedge-shaped head with an angle that depends on the club while a putter can be shaped like a blade, semicircle or other shape.

Provide additional details on each clubhead, indicating the face of the clubhead, the sole and the hosel. Explain how the face is the part that comes into contact with the ball while the sole brushes the ground and the hosel attaches the head to the shaft. Explain that irons have grooves on their faces to impart bite and spin when contacting the ball.

About the Author

Toronto-based journalist William McCoy has been writing since 1997, specializing in topics such as sports, nutrition and health. He serves as the Studio's sports and recreation section expert. McCoy is a journalism graduate of Ryerson University.

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