Exercises for Shoulder Injuries

By Michael Hinckley
Arm extension held prevent shoulder injuries that can occur from the golf swing.
Arm extension held prevent shoulder injuries that can occur from the golf swing.

Shoulder injuries are fairly common in golfing. The swing asks the muscles to move very quickly, which can cause tearing of the muscles, tendons or joint tissues. In most cases, physical therapy and time can heal shoulder injuries but only if the exercises for the shoulder injury are done with proper form. With some expert advice and the right technique, you can be driving the ball off the tee in as little as a few days.

Medical Attention

Seek medical guidance. Before entering any physical therapy program, seek medical help and guidance to ensure a proper and speedy recovery. Physicians, physical therapists, and personal trainers are good sources of advice and supervision.

Rotate Your Shoulder

Rotate your shoulder. Lay face-down on a workout bench or bed and extend your arm out over the edge. Bend your elbow and point your fingertips toward the floor. Keeping your elbow even with your shoulder, rotate your arm so your hand becomes even with your head. Slowly return your hand to the starting position. Repeat 10 times for each arm.

Extension

Extend your arm. Standing up straight, shoulders squared and your head facing forward, extend your arm outward away from your body as far up as it can go. Slowly lower it and repeat the process for the opposite arm. Repeat 10 times per arm. For additional challenge and strength training, weights or a resistance band (Thera-Band) may be used.

Circles

Rotate your arms in large circles. Standing up, shoulders square and facing forward, lift both arm straight in front of you. Continue the motion upwards toward the ceiling and then toward your back. Continue rotating slowly until you reach the beginning position. Repeat 10 times then try rotating backwards. Repeat backwards rotations 10 times.

About the Author

Michael Hinckley received a Bachelor of Arts degree in US history from the University of Cincinnati, a Master of Arts degree in Middle East history from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Hinckley is conversant in Arabic, and is a part-time lecturer at two Midwestern universities.

Photo Credits

  • Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images
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