How Do I Change Golf Spikes?

By Timothy Bodamer
Think of your golf shoes as the tires on your car, if not properly maintained you're likely to run into problems.
Think of your golf shoes as the tires on your car, if not properly maintained you're likely to run into problems.

Changing golf spikes regularly is an important part of maintaining a solid stance and proper footing. Spikes are made of plastic or steel and require a special tool to remove them. This tool is usually sold with packages of plastic spikes or as part of a divot tool. Removing and changing spikes takes some patience, but the task is a key part of maximizing shoe performance.

Clean the bottom of the shoe to prepare to remove the spikes. Wet a golf brush or wire brush with soapy water. Scrub the bottom of the sole with the brush vigorously, checking progress periodically. Use a golf towel to dry the shoe bottom. If any debris or residue remains after drying, repeat this step.

Place the wrench onto the spike and turn counter-clockwise. Align the spike around the base of the spike. The spike should loosen after one revolution.

Some tools will have two protrusions that are placed in corresponding holes on the spike (the holes may need additional cleaning in order to be used). For this type of took, insert the tool into the spike and turn counter-clockwise until loose enough for the spike to be removed by hand.

Remove metal spikes using the wrench tool or a pair of pliers. Discard the removed spike.

Clean the area where the spike was removed. Dig out any dirt or debris with a divot repair tool. Wipe clean with a towel.

Place and tighten the new spike with your fingers, turning clockwise. Use the spike wrench to tighten further if the spike is still loose. Repeat for the remaining cleats. Six or seven cleats per shoe is the standard.

About the Author

Tim Bodamer is a freelance writer based in Seminole, Florida. He attended Edinboro Univerity of Pennsylvania where he studied journalism. He has 15 years of writing experience and specializes in sports, business and general interest topics.

Photo Credits

  • Sam Greenwood/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images
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